The above is a comment that Madison “MADI” Butler left on my Twitter on Friday evening. If you Google her even a little bit, you’ll find a few articles calling her “one of the most inclusive voices on LinkedIn.” I don’t know; the above comment doesn’t seem that inclusive to me, but perhaps I’m missing the definition of inclusion a little bit. This all began because I ghost-wrote something for a “millennial influencer” and she responded to that person posting the article saying “You’d be pleased to know he’s a racist.” I thought that was a bit much, so I…


There are several tiers to this concept.

The first tier is about how we speak about diversity not being common or universal, even within the same industry. You’ll see DEI, DEIB, DEIBA, D&I, and more.

That tier is not necessarily surprising: acronyms allow us to easily form in-groups and out-groups around what we know and have access to. As we find our tribe within work, we become more comfortable. It also allows for easy recall. We can chunk information and reduce brain strain.

The problem there, though: Every time we introduce a new word or concept, we need a relatively-accepted…


Here’s a new article on Wharton about “how to bring your conscience to work.” My first thought upon seeing the headline was “Yea, sure I’ll do that — if the executives do it first.” The sheer reality of many companies is that the incentive structures are often designed to encourage people to be less than good humans and, in the process, they can get more for themselves. …


Here’s the 97,121st article about hybrid work released in the past 36 hours. This one is actually pretty good and breaks down the different decisions that leaders will need to make, but ultimately the “solution sets” part of the article is hideously flawed. It encourages leaders to think deeply, visualize, rank things, talk to people, etc. Senior leaders don’t do those things. If you’re talking about a man with 30 years in a vertical and you tell him to slow down and think and visualize, you basically just told him he’s not decisive and action-oriented. If you tell a man…


I won’t go hard on this topic, because in my day I’ve already written about the power of belief on narrative, the idea that we live in a belief-driven world and not a data-driven one, the concept of guesswork vs. Big Data, the idea of “gut feel” vs. “use analytics,” and much more. I think your life is shaped by your belief structure and your ideology, and The Platform Economy — like-minded groups and rabbit holes — has only underscored that.

Now we have a pretty good article out of Northwestern about all this, and I say “pretty good” because…


The chart above is from The Conference Board, and here’s the written summary — the “abstract,” you might say — of a report they did. Pay attention to this part:

Nearly 60 percent of companies reported that productivity increased in their organization over the past year. That’s according to a new survey from The Conference Board of more than 230 HR executives. …


Here’s an article from Stanford called “Why People Who Have It Easy Claim They Had It Rough,” which is also known in some circles as “Professional-Grade Virtue Signaling,” a huge component of work that we often ignore. There’s a lot of good stuff in this Stanford article about race and privilege and the value of work ethic and perception of how advantaged you are, and I’d definitely encourage you to read it if you have time. This is potentially the most important part:

“If we lived in a society with an aristocracy, we’d justify it on bloodlines,” Lowery says. “You…


Lived in Fort Worth seven years next month — admittedly sometimes I have no idea why. I have some good friends here, but also feel lonely like a motherf’er a lot. I’ve been in two relationships, which is both a blessing and an indictment. I’m not super liberal, but I’m not as arch-conservative as Fort Worth people can be either. If we’re being open and honest and a little bit sad, part of the reason I ended up staying post-divorce was that I had nowhere else to go. I’m from New York City but my earning potential ain’t at that…


If you look at different surveys about what workers (employees) want from work in the supposed “New Normal,” you almost have a 33% breakdown along three potential solutions:

  • We all come back to HQs.
  • We all go remote.
  • Some hybrid (a mix of the two).

Well, as noted yesterday by Neuroleadership Institute’s David Rock on this webinar, here’s the problem: if you choose one lane and say this is the only lane, you will subsequently alienate 66% of your workforce, which isn’t a good talent position to be in.

This is a complicated time for talent discussions, because we’re at…


Working with a place right now that wants to get more of its content into Strategy+Business, so periodically I look at said site and see what content they have just to see if I could help create something that might resonate for them. I was over there just now and came across this article on culture vs. strategy, which is pretty good. Literally every business hustler under the sun attributes the “Culture eats strategy for breakfast” deal to Peter Drucker, but it wasn’t actually him. It seems like it comes from much later — some dude named Mark Fields, who…

Ted Bauer

Blogging, largely about work and how to improve it. How I make (some) money: http://thecontextofthings.com/work-with-me/

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store