I’ve been sending it out too much recently, so I’m scaling it back — you’d get about one/week. Here’s the link to sign up. Hope to see ya on the…

I used to work at this place called FireMon, which does cyber security, for part of 2018. At the time I got this job, it was pretty exciting because I was dead broke for a lot of the end of 2017, and this represented a new hope. Plus: the CEO personally did one of the final interviews, and I thought that was cool. Once I started, it was largely a comedy of errors. We hired a CMO who had a “five-year plan.” He left after 10 months. He regularly called meetings about “sales-marketing dynamics,” then would let sales just not…


Saw that headline above over at Harvard Business Review just now. Rebecca Knight, who I believe works for INSIDER these days, is usually pretty good. The article itself, linked here, isn’t bad and actually has some examples of how to deal with a so-called “brilliant jerk,” which I believe is a term we’ve now attributed to Reed Hastings, origin-wise.

So while the article itself is good, here’s the problem: how does an executive look at a brilliant jerk? If the executive is self-aware, which is sadly pretty rare in most companies, they will see “Well, this guy or gal performs…


Here are a couple of pops that my friend sent me, apparently from yesterday’s Wall Street Journal:

(1) Between February 2020 and March 2021, nearly 1.1 million women of prime working age — between the ages of 25 and 54 — dropped out of the labor force, compared with 830,000 men in that age group, according to the Labor Department.

(2) One of the most likely explanations is that some mothers had little choice, financially, but to take paying work, says Ms. Heggeness, even if that meant taking a step backward. “Women are making choices out of need, that aren’t…


Years ago, when I was first starting to blog, I wrote a small thing about how the 2008 recession was good for the status quo, because it kept a lot of Boomers in place longer than they maybe would have stayed, due to fiscal reasons (i.e. they lost money, the value of their home, what have you). As time has passed since that 2014 post, increasingly I think Boomers stay in place simply because they want to work and fear retirement = death. I may be speaking predominantly about men here, but I am a man, so that’s a bit…


A couple of years back, after the Orlando shootings, I sat in my old apartment — less than a year later I’d be living there solo, divorced — and read this New Yorker article on the gun business. I subsequently turned that article into this post on the value of having an enemy, featuring this pull quote from New Yorker:

For several years, Schmidt had a sideline in packaging his sales techniques. He calls the approach “tribal marketing.” It’s based on generating revenue by emphasizing the boundaries of a community. “We all have the need to belong,” he wrote in…


Darren Walker, the President of the Ford Foundation, was on 60 Minutes last night. Walker is a tremendous story in that he’s an African-American gay male who rose up from a two-room shack in east Texas to be a king of the New York City virtue-bombing philanthropy scene, including a salary of $1M/year and a past on Wall Street as a crack bond sales guy. Most people from where Darren is from, who look like Darren does, can’t get that far. But he did, and thus he’s a great topper for the Ford Foundation, a major player in American grant-giving…


Because of the scale of performative wokeness and generalizations we’ve assigned to Gen Z, we want to believe this is finally the moment for diversity and inclusion to rise up. This is a confusing topic for many, because there’s a lot of emotional intensity and labor going into diversity discussions at the personal level, but corporations seem to do exactly nothing but what they’ve always done. Why? Short answer: a company’s job is to make money, not necessarily endorse social justice initiatives.


Here’s a post from Eric Barker about emotionally-aware friendships, which largely draws from this book from a professor at Oxford. There are any number of good pull quotes and sequences in the book/blog post, and let me hit you with a few of them:

Our data suggest that, on average, you could expect to have one terminal (i.e. unreconciled) relationship breakdown every 2.3 years.

This would seem accurate. I don’t think friendship is static — like I don’t think if you lose one friend, you automatically gain one, or you just lose it with no gain. Oftentimes you lose 1–2…

Ted Bauer

Blogging, largely about work and how to improve it. How I make (some) money: http://thecontextofthings.com/work-with-me/

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